Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Brutally Honest Guide to Being Brutally Honest

It’s scary, isn’t it?

Having to tell a truth to someone who may not want to hear it.

Whether you have to tell a friend they’ve been betrayed, inform a client that their ideas suck, or write a blog post to burst your reader’s bubble, hard truths can feel almost as painful to deliver as they are to receive.

Because just the thought of hurting someone is scary. You don’t want that.

And you don’t know how they’ll react. They might think you’re a jerk and cut all ties with you. You don’t want that either.

So sometimes you obfuscate the truth to spare them the pain of hearing it. Sometimes you even keep it to yourself or tell a white lie.

Well, I have to tell you something, and you may not like to hear it. But if you struggle with the art of being frank, you need to hear this. It will make you a better person, a better communicator and a better blogger.

So here it is …

You’re a coward.

If you can’t be brutally honest with people, especially when you know it’s in their best interest, you’re a coward.

Why You Can’t Be a Coward When It Comes to Hard Truths

You’re not doing anyone a favor by withholding a truth from them, even if it’s difficult for them to hear.

The only person you’re protecting is yourself. Because you’re afraid of the consequences to you.

But it’s not about you.

Being honest is about making sure your audience has the information they need to make good decisions. That includes information they may not like.

You may convince yourself it’s “nicer” to hide or obfuscate things that are difficult for them to hear, but it’s not.

Ignorance doesn’t lead to bliss, it leads to bad decision-making. There’s nothing “nice” about that.

And as a blogger trying to help your readers, honesty is that much more important.

Because readers rely on your expertise and your candor.  They rely on you to set them straight when they’re headed the wrong way. They rely on you to guide them in the right direction.

You may fear you’ll lose readers when you tell them a hard truth, but withholding it is far riskier. Because it will hurt your credibility in the long run.

When you’re honest at all times, whether in your writing or in your personal life, people will know what to expect from you. And when they need the truth, you’re the one they will come to.

Yes, you may lose some readers along the way, but you’ll gain the trust and respect of so many more.

The Big Mistake People Make While Being Brutally Honest

Brutal honesty is not about being cruel, rude, shocking, or harsh. That’s not brutal honesty. It’s just brutal.

If that’s what you’re going for, you’re doing it wrong.

Maybe that seems obvious to you, but many people mistake brutal honesty for honest brutality. You’ve probably experienced more than your share. So if it’s that obvious, why do so many people make this mistake?

Because it’s not obvious. In fact, it’s almost counterintuitive.

Many people think that the point of brutal honesty is to shock someone into hearing you. They think that the point is to be so harsh that the other person can’t help but hear the truth.

But that’s not really how it works. Treating people harshly will only make them less receptive to what you have to say, not more.

The point of brutal honesty is to be completely honest and let the truth speak for itself. It’s about not holding anything back — about not telling white lies to make a person feel better, or withholding information they might find hurtful. Those are things we do on a regular basis, and the point of brutal honesty is to stop doing that.

You see, the emphasis in brutal honesty should be on the honesty, not on the brutality.

It is the truth that you need to deliver, and not your delivery itself, that needs to be brutally unrestrained.

Of course, the problem is that being brutally honest isn’t just hard to do—it’s hard to do well. That’s because it’s not just about what you say; it’s also about why, when, and how.

brutal honesty is not about being cruel

3 Common Situations That Call for Brutal Honesty

Honesty is always a good policy, but not every situation calls for brutal honesty. So how do you know when it’s time to hold nothing back?

At the end of the day, it’s about assessing the situation, being clear about your purpose, and using your judgment.

But here are three common scenarios that often call for brutal truth:

#1. When They Want Your Help in Deluding Themselves


Whenever someone comes to you to confirm their delusions, you need to do the exact opposite.

For example, many bloggers might love to hear that all they need to do to make money is write posts and slap ads on them. They might want to hear that riches are right around the corner, even if they only just got started. But what they need to hear is that there’s no such thing as easy success, that it takes time, and that they must adjust their expectations.

Trying to sugar-coat this reality wouldn’t help them.

#2. When They’re Making a Dreadful Mistake


You wouldn’t let a friend walk blindly into traffic without reaching out a hand to pull them back. Hell, you wouldn’t even be so inconsiderate to a stranger.

So why would you let them make a harmful decision without trying to save them from it?

Sure, walking into traffic is likely to cause them serious harm — but so is making a decision that would ruin their career, blow their life savings, or land them in jail.

If they’re about to make a big mistake — or even if they’ve already made the mistake — your willingness to be brutally honest with them might just be the thing that saves them from future pain.

#3. When Subtlety Has Failed


How do you know when brutal honesty is called for?

When nothing else has worked. By all means, try a subtler, gentler approach first—but when nothing seems to get through to them, it’s time to take off the kid gloves and tell them what they need to hear, without holding back.

Situations That Call for Brutal Honesty

These aren’t the only circumstances which call for brutal honesty, but they are frequent ones, and they have two basic principles in common: the hearer badly needs to be told the truth, and yet it is very difficult for them to discover or receive it.

And that’s where you come in.

8 Steps to Being Brutally Honest Without Crushing Anyone’s Spirit

Great. So you understand what brutal honesty is, and what it is not. You know why brutal honesty is sometimes necessary, and when it is appropriate.

Now comes the hard part: How do you actually do it?

Here is an eight-step process to help you deliver that hard truth.

#1. Be Brutally Honest with Yourself


Brutal honesty begins with yourself. If you’re hesitant and tend to shy away from bluntly honest conversations, then the first step is to acknowledge why you hesitate.

Are you afraid of offending people? Ask yourself whether allowing them to continue on a harmful path is kinder than having an uncomfortable conversation with them.

Are you afraid that people will get mad at you, and perhaps cut ties with you? Do you worry about losing readers, subscribers, or clients?

As I mentioned above, ask yourself whether they’re better off not knowing, or whether you just don’t want to be the one to tell them.

Remind yourself that this is about doing what is best for them, not what is easiest on you.

#2. Check Your Motives


In the first step, you checked your motives for not wanting to be brutally honest with someone. In this step, flip that around—ask yourself if being honest with them is really about their well-being, or if it’s about you.

Yeah, that happens, too.

If it’s more about your desire to speak your mind than about what they need to hear, you’re likely to end up falling into that trap of being more brutal than honest.

So ask yourself this classic trio of questions about your message:

  1. Is it true?
  2. Is it necessary?
  3. Is it kind (or helpful)?

If the answer to all three isn’t yes, it’s time to reevaluate.

#3. Be More Honest than Brutal


Remember, the point is always honesty, not brutality.

You can tell the brutal truth without being brutal yourself. Let the truth be merciless on its own. It is hard enough for many to hear and face. So don’t add to it. Be kind.

Let me say that again: Tell them the whole truth, no matter how brutal it may be, but do it with kindness and empathy.

Be more honest than brutal

#4. Prepare Them for What’s Coming


Don’t just launch straight into the tough love. Give them the opportunity to prepare themselves for it.

Explain that you care about them. Explain that you have to tell them something you believe they need to hear, and prepare them for the degree of honesty they’re about to get from you.

For an example, look no further than what I did in the intro to this post:

Well, I have to tell you something, and you may not like to hear it. But if you struggle with the art of being frank, you need to hear this.

It doesn’t take much. Just a heads-up about what’s coming, so that your audience can put themselves in the right frame of mind for it. Blindsiding them won’t make them more receptive to hearing a brutal truth.

#5. Reveal Your Intentions


Why are you telling them this difficult truth? What do you want to come of it? How is hearing it worthwhile to them?

Understanding what they have to gain from it will make the other person much more receptive to the harsh truth. It will be much easier for them to hear and accept if they genuinely believe that you’re trying to help them.

So take a moment to tell them why you think what you’re about to tell them is the best thing for them.

Again, you can see how I did that in this post. Before I hit you with the brutal truth, I first told you how I thought it would benefit you:

… if you struggle with the art of being frank, you need to hear this. It will make you a better person, a better communicator and a better blogger.

And then, with the benefit still fresh in your mind, I took off the gloves and told you the blunt truth.

#6. Be Short and Sweet


It’s never a good idea to beat a dead horse. As a writer, it’s a great way to get people to stop reading.

But this is even more true when your reader is taking a beating, too. Being told a hard truth is never fun. Sometimes it’s necessary. But having it thrown in your face over and over is something few people react well to.

So get to the point. Make it clearly and succinctly, and move on.

Anything more, and you’re heading back toward being more brutal than honest.

You’re a coward.

If you can’t be brutally honest with people, especially when you know it’s in their best interest, you’re a coward.

Notice how I don’t dwell on the cowardice for too long? Instead, I quickly move on to explaining the reasons behind my remarks.

Keep brutal honesty short and sweet

#7. Stick to the Facts


This is easier for some topics than it is for others. Sometimes the facts are clear, measurable, and objective. You’ve got actual data, research — cold, hard facts. Other times, the issue at hand is a subjective assessment.

But even when the subject matter is wholly subjective, you can keep the discussion focused on the relevant issues.

Be as objective as you can, given the subject matter. Avoid emotional observations. Focus on actions — things the other person has done, or things they need to do — rather than on character and personality.

Most of all, focus on problems that can be solved.

Again, you can see that in my approach to this post. I didn’t dwell on negatives or beat you over the head with character flaws. As you can see below, I focused on the facts — which, in this case, meant explaining why I had just called you a coward by emphasizing things I knew you’d agree with:

“Being honest is about making sure your audience has the information they need to make good decisions. That includes information they may not like.

You may convince yourself it’s “nicer” to hide or obfuscate things that are difficult for them to hear, but it’s not.

Ignorance doesn’t lead to bliss, it leads to bad decision-making. There’s nothing “nice” about that.”

#8. Conclude with a Solution


Don’t leave them feeling bad because of the truth bomb you just dropped on them. Help them figure out a solution. Give them a way forward.

Most of all, tell them how you’re going to help them, and commit to helping them tackle the issue.

How you end the discussion can make all the difference.

Do you want them to feel defeated, beat down, and discouraged? Or do you want them to feel hopeful that there are concrete ways that they can address the issue?

Imagine if I ended this post after calling you a coward, without offering any advice on how to deliver brutal truths. That would make the overall message feel far less benevolent and far more antagonistic, wouldn’t it?

Have the Courage to Tell the Unvarnished Truth and You’ll Win People’s Respect

Telling someone a hard truth can be scary.

Because you don’t know how people will react.

And I won’t lie. Some people won’t like it. Even if you take all the right steps, you may still offend them, and you may still lose them.

But you’ll also gain others who recognize the value of someone they can trust to be honest — the type of people who may never have paid attention to you while you were busy telling everyone what they wanted to hear.

And as you develop a reputation as a person who tells it straight, you will gain people’s respect. You will gain credibility and authority. People will seek out your advice, value your perspective, and appreciate your honesty.

And you will help people—far more than when you were telling them whatever they wanted to hear.

And isn’t that the point?

About the Author: Josh Tucker is the founder of The New Progressive. As a race and social justice writer, he’s no stranger to telling hard truths.

Better Content, Better Websites, and a Little Inspiration

Better Content, Better Websites, and a Little Inspiration

On Monday, Brian Clark kicked off a new series of quick copy tips. These are short, powerful techniques that can make your copy more persuasive and get you to your goals faster.

This time, Brian taught us about the Proclamation Lead — a way to cut through the clutter and start your content with a bang. If you’re struggling to make your content stand out, or you just want a potent way to get your message across, give it a try …

On Tuesday, we welcomed our colleague Chris Garrett back to the blog. He wrote about 10 rather sad business website mistakes he recently saw over and over again while he conducted some site critiques — and solutions that will make things better.

And on Wednesday, I asked our editorial team to share their favorite quotes about writing. If you need a little dose of inspiration, there’s a lot to choose from there.

On the Copyblogger FM podcast, I talked about when to go negative with your content — and when to keep things sunny and light. Positive and negative messages both have their place in a smart content marketing strategy, if you deploy them at the right times.

That’s it for this week — have a great weekend, and we’ll see you Monday. :)

— Sonia Simone
Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital

Catch up on this week’s content


quick copy tipCapture and Hold Audience Attention with a Bold Proclamation

by Brian Clark


does your current website hosting company prevent or punish your success?10 Often Overlooked Website Mistakes that May Harm Your Business

by Chris Garrett


editorial roundtable7 Classic Quotes to Inspire Your Writing

by Sonia Simone


Which Works Better: Positive or Negative Content?Which Works Better: Positive or Negative Content?

by Sonia Simone


Are You Making This Common SEO Mistake?Are You Making This Common SEO Mistake?

by Jerod Morris


Busting the Myth of the Starving Artist with Jeff Goins: Part OneBusting the Myth of the Starving Artist with Jeff Goins: Part One

by Kelton Reid


Unleash Your Intuition to Win, with Bernadette JiwaUnleash Your Intuition to Win, with Bernadette Jiwa

by Brian Clark


What Should I Do with My Archive?What Should I Do with My Archive?

by Jerod Morris & Jon Nastor


The post Better Content, Better Websites, and a Little Inspiration appeared first on Copyblogger.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Run a Business Like Jeff Bezos: Bryan Eisenberg Shares Amazon's 4 Pillars of Success

7 Classic Quotes to Inspire Your Writing

Editorial Roundtable

Writing is a glorious and rewarding experience, a noble craft, one of the most satisfying ways you can spend your time — at least, while your clothes are on.

Except for the days when it’s horrible.

Maybe that’s why writers love quotes about writing. They help remind us of those lofty aspects and give us courage to get through the crummy parts.

For your inspiration and encouragement, here are some favorite quotes on writing from our editorial team.

Brian Clark

Brian gets us started with one of the classics:

“I write one page of masterpiece to ninety-one pages of shit,” Hemingway confided to F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1934. “I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.”

Robert Bruce

If there are two things Robert loves, it’s David Mamet and morbid references. His favorite quote combines the two:

“Having spent too many years in show business, the one thing I see that succeeds is persistence. It’s the person who just ain’t gonna go home. I decided early on that I wasn’t going to go home. This is what I’ll be doing until they put me in jail or in a coffin.” – David Mamet

Stefanie Flaxman

Stefanie’s favorite is an artful bit of philosophy:

“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.” – Ana├»s Nin

Chris Garrett

This one has been attributed to Mark Twain, T.S. Eliot, Cicero, and others, but it turns out it was originally written by Blaise Pascal. “Je n’ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n’ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte.”

“I only made this so long because I didn’t have time to make it shorter.” – Blaise Pascal

Kelton Reid

Kelton goes for a little Irish passion.

“Write it, damn you, write it! What else are you good for?” – James Joyce

Sonia Simone

Since I put this post together, I get two. :) Toni Morrison is a toweringly great novelist and one of my favorite writers. Here’s what she has to say about the writing we put into the world — or, of course, any creative work:

“If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” – Toni Morrison

And the other, from the gorgeously layered novel Song of Solomon, is solid advice for writers, creative people, or really, any of us:

“You wanna fly, you got to give up the shit that weighs you down.” – Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon

How about you?

Do you have a favorite writing quote? Let us know in the comments!

The post 7 Classic Quotes to Inspire Your Writing appeared first on Copyblogger.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

10 Often Overlooked Website Mistakes that May Harm Your Business

"Does your current website hosting company prevent or punish your success?" – Chris Garrett

At a local WordCamp recently, I critiqued websites from a group of volunteers during a site clinic session.

While I noticed a number of common mistakes — like extra-loud, auto-play videos and other distractions — one of the weird things that stood out was how many real, substantial businesses had problematic web hosting and domain strategies.

With those in mind, I wanted to make sure you aren’t making the same mistakes. Let’s go through some of the worst offenses, shall we?

Mistake #1: Spending more money on business cards than your web host

It boggles my mind that a company with a great physical-world reputation would risk that goodwill by using a subpar web host.

In other words, if your coffee budget is 10 times higher than your hosting budget, you’re probably not getting a premium service.

Also, if your hosting company brags about having millions of customers, they might not be too upset if your site goes down — but the hit to your bottom line will be substantial.

Mistake #2: Choosing a domain nobody can spell or remember

You said “awesome-and-amazing-dot-com?” Was it “theawesome,” “the-awesome,” or just “awesome?”

Sure, many people are going to discover your site through links or search. But having a memorable (and easy-to-spell) domain does help you attract and retain visitors.

You can’t bank on them bookmarking your site during their first visit.

Mistake #3: Building your business website on a platform you don’t own

Digital sharecropping is even worse than a bad domain.

With this mistake, you’re always at risk of losing the web presence you’re working so hard to build.

Mistake #4: Using an impersonal business email address

If you invest in a beautiful website design, then don’t use “@outlook,” “@gmail,” or “@hotmail” for your business’s primary email address.

If you use Outlook or Gmail to pick up and manage your email, that’s totally fine. Just be sure you use your own domain for your email address. You can use an email forwarder or domain settings to get the best of both worlds.

Mistake #5: Redirecting to a mobile site

What was that page you asked for again?

This might be controversial, but in my opinion there is no reason to send your visitors to a separate mobile site that doesn’t correspond to the URL they originally typed.

I wanted to go directly to the dancing kittens, not your mobile website home page.

Responsive design and mobile-first thinking will give your users a great experience no matter what device they’re on, and you won’t confuse site visitors with redirects.

Mistake #6: Providing a slow experience for visitors

Is it acceptable for a web page to take ten seconds to load? Six? How about three?

No.

As it happens, Google will punish you if your site provides a slow experience and visitors quickly hit the “back” button.

When your site has good hosting, site speed is measured in milliseconds.

Mistake #7: Getting an unexpected “this site not found” or “this site is dangerous” message

Do you have a process in place to check your site at least once a day? Are you sure it’s working, and that everything looks the way you want it to? Is your site clean and free of malware or other nasty problems?

You either have to constantly monitor your site … or choose a host that does the monitoring for you (and ideally prevents those types of headaches from happening in the first place).

Mistake #8: Keeping “http,” instead of upgrading to “https”

I was late to this party, but get your site on SSL.

With StudioPress Sites, it takes one click. It’s an SEO win, and the security will comfort your visitors.

Mistake #9: Falling behind with outdated software and design

Out-of-date versions of site software make your website an easy target for hackers.

And speaking of staying current … when was the last time you updated your web design?

I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase “dress for the job you want.” Make a strong, professional first impression with a clean, modern design.

You don’t have to spend a fortune on a custom design, either. Just select a high-quality theme and add your branding flourishes. Choose one that is mobile-responsive and doesn’t take hours to load over 3G.

For example, you could pick up one of the many premium WordPress themes from StudioPress that come bundled with StudioPress Sites.

Mistake #10: Hosting with a company that prevents or punishes your success

This last one will catch you by surprise at the worst moment.

You get your 15 minutes (or 15,000 visitors) of fame, only for your host to tell you … nope! Not on their watch.

They shut you down.

There it is, in the fine print of your hosting contract … you’re only allowed a certain number of visitors or so much bandwidth … which means all your new prospects land on a page that says your website is down.

It’s smart to keep your costs manageable when you’re starting out, but losing potential customers because of penny-pinching isn’t so smart.

If you currently have cheap “hobby” hosting, you need to ask yourself:

How many clients or customers can I afford to lose to a bad web experience?

Let us know in the comments below about other business website mistakes you’ve seen or if a company has ever lost you as a client or customer because you had issues using their site.

So, what should you do?

  1. Sign up for StudioPress Sites. For $27 a month, you’ll get rock-solid, ultra-secure hosting — plus your choice of 21 professional designs you can customize with your own branding, automatic WordPress updates, peace of mind, and the knowledge that when that big traffic spike comes, your site will be up, available, and screamingly fast. (And let’s face it … that investment is probably a lot less than your latte habit every month.) Click here to learn more.
  2. Select a straightforward domain name, and use it for your site and email.
  3. Hit that “https” button and upgrade to the SSL version of your site. You might lose some social proof, as your social share counts reset, but it’s well worth it in the long run.

The post 10 Often Overlooked Website Mistakes that May Harm Your Business appeared first on Copyblogger.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Capture and Hold Audience Attention with a Bold Proclamation

Quick Copy Tip

If you’ve studied copywriting, you know the purpose of the headline is to get people to click and start reading. And your opening copy needs to continue that momentum all the way to the offer or conclusion.

One way to do that is to make a bold, seemingly unreasonable assertion in your title or headline. A proclamation so jarring that the right person can’t help but keep reading, listening, or watching to see where you’re going with it.

As far as I can tell, copywriter John Forde (whose site tagline is, not coincidently, “Learn to sell or else …”) was the first to define the Proclamation Lead:

A well-constructed Proclamation Lead begins with an emotionally-compelling statement, usually in the form of the headline. And then, in the copy that follows, the reader is given information that demonstrates the validity of the implicit promise made.

This type of lead works for both sales copy and persuasive content. Let me give you a couple of examples.

Forde illustrates the Proclamation Lead with a direct mail report that is ultimately selling an alternative health newsletter. Written by Jim Rutz, the piece immediately startles and tempts the prospect with a bold statement:

Read This Or Die

Today you have a 95% chance of eventually dying from a disease or condition from which there is already a known cure somewhere on the planet. The editor of Alternatives would like to free you from that destiny.

The copy continues not by jumping to the offer, but instead by backing up the proclamation. In the process, the piece systematically removes the objections raised in the reader’s mind about the scientific validity of the bold assertions.

If you feel that example is a little too “direct marketing” for your audience, consider this from respected best-selling author Austin Kleon:

Steal Like an Artist:
10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative

It’s the exact same technique for a completely different target market. The intent is to startle people interested in becoming more creative, while concurrently tempting prospects to further explore what Kleon means by “steal.”

The first example is copy designed to make a sale. The second example is content (a book) that is the product itself. But the reason why both “sell” is the same.

The key to these bold headlines and leads is the immediate emotional response provoked by the assertion. More importantly, that emotional trigger leads to immediate motivation to investigate further — and that’s what every copywriter aims to achieve right from the beginning.

That’s because implicit in the proclamation is a promise. In the Rutz and Kleon examples, you’re promised that you’ll learn about hidden cures to common diseases and the way creativity really works, respectively.

How do you come up with these types of bold beginnings? John Forde says they’re found via research, not conjured up out of the ether — and I agree.

For example, people often assume creativity comes from introspection, perhaps during long sessions of gazing out the window.

But if you research how artists throughout history actually work, creativity is much more about starting with something already out in the world — often the work of someone else — and making it into something new.

Austin Kleon discovered that truth, and then boiled it down to its shocking essence. After all, it was Picasso who famously said, “Good artists copy; great artists steal.”

That said, the proclamation approach is not always the right one for every situation. For example, I could have titled this article:

Read This Unless You Want to Starve

But that would have been lame, so I didn’t. There are plenty of other headline and lead approaches that also work well, so that headline wouldn’t be accurate or appropriate.

If you find a counterintuitive truth that’s relevant to your persuasive aim, however, you might just see if you can turn it into an almost unreasonably bold assertion that works wonders. But remember, don’t steal specific copy approaches (in the artistic sense) unless you’re sure you can perfectly tailor them for your audience or prospect.

The post Capture and Hold Audience Attention with a Bold Proclamation appeared first on Copyblogger.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Expand Your Content Marketing Toolkit

Expand Your Content Marketing Toolkit

On Monday, our friend Jon Nastor shared the top tips he’s learned from conducting more than 350 podcast interviews in two years. He has a lot of solid advice here on how to better prepare for your interviews — without making your content stiff or robotic.

On Tuesday, our editorial assistant Will DeWitt revealed how his experiences on a recent cruise shaped how he thinks about customer experience — and how you can structure your content to make your audience feel like treasured guests.

And on Wednesday, Stefanie Flaxman saved us from the humiliation of 12 different word choice errors. Because content marketing is just more fun when you’re not embarrassing yourself in public.

On the Copyblogger FM podcast this week, I talked about how to attract the specific audience you want to your business, podcast, or blog. Everything you do will get much easier when you know you’re talking to the right folks.

And on our brand-new Sites podcast, Jerod Morris covered easy ways you can use excellent design to forge a stronger connection with your audience. (By the way, Jerod mentions a free coupon you might want to pick up if you’re looking for better hosting — it expires tomorrow, on July 14, so you’ll want to hop to it.)

That’s it for this week — have a great weekend, and we’ll see you Monday. :)

— Sonia Simone
Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital

Catch up on this week’s content


if you want interesting responses, you have to ask the right questionsHow to Conduct Not-to-Miss Podcast Interviews

by Jon Nastor


we didn’t feel like customers. We felt like family3 Ways the ‘Cruise Ship’ Model Invites Your Audience Aboard

by Will DeWitt


write the correct words the first time and you’ll spend less time editing laterStop Making These 12 Word Choice Errors Once and for All

by Stefanie Flaxman


How to Attract the Exact Customers You WantHow to Attract the Exact Customers You Want

by Sonia Simone


3 Ways to Better Connect with Your Audience through Design3 Ways to Better Connect with Your Audience through Design

by Jerod Morris


How Award-Winning Short Story Writer Abigail Ulman Writes: Part TwoHow Award-Winning Short Story Writer Abigail Ulman Writes: Part Two

by Kelton Reid


The Power of the Company of One, with Paul JarvisThe Power of the Company of One, with Paul Jarvis

by Brian Clark


The post Expand Your Content Marketing Toolkit appeared first on Copyblogger.